Marching feet – Wilfred Pegge’s Foot Book

04122013@0943
There is a collection of papers relating to Wilfred John Pegge held by Manchester Central Library.
They are a fascinating mix of field message books, field diaries, training notes, books and pamphlets. There are even maps of France and Belgium, some taken from the Germans.

Wilfred Pegge joined the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps in February 1916. He was appointed Second Lieutenant Territorial Force in the 6th Rifle battalion of the King’s Liverpool Regiment. He served in France and Flanders as an officer, commanding No.1 Platoon. He was gassed in France in July 1917. In September 1918 he was raised to Lieutenant.
He was awarded the Military Cross on the 2nd December 1918.
One of his responsibilities was to look after the feet of the soldiers under his command.
We know about trench foot and the state of army boots. There are stories of men urinating in their boots to soften the leather. Women on the home front were knitting woollen socks to send to the troops. Men were expected to march up to thirty miles a day. A recipe for disaster if your feet failed you.

04122013@0939_00002

04122013@0939

04122013@0939_00001

In civilian life Wilfred Pegge continued with public service as a partner in a Manchester firm of solicitors. Wilding, Earley and Pegge. He acted as legal adviser to the diocese of Salford. He was president of the Salford Diocesan Truth Society Council from 1931-1932 and again from 1950-1952.
In 1953 he became a Knight Commander of the Order of St Gregory.
He was Conservative councillor for St Ann’s Ward from 1937 to 1949. He became councillor for Barlow Moor ward in 1949. He was made an alderman in 1960. Ill health prevented him from standing for Mayor in 1966.

To find out more about Wilfred Pegge’s collection visit our online catalogue: http://www.gmlives.org.uk/results.html#imu%5Brid=ecatalogue.294809%5D

One thought on “Marching feet – Wilfred Pegge’s Foot Book

  1. Peter Brydon

    I am very fortunate in having Wilfred Pegge`s service dress tunic in my collection and would be happy to provide a photograph of it.

    P.B.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s